Be a Great Communicator

It does not matter how beautifully crafted your code is nor how detailed and carefully thought out your plan is. If you cannot communicate in a way that your listener or reader understands and embraces then none of it really matters.

A great communicator makes the complicated simple, the mountain a molehill, a threat an opportunity, the difficult do-able.  What needs to said and what needs to omitted. Who needs to know and who does not. When is the right time or when nothing needs to be said.

Choose wisely how you communicate. Orally in person, by phone or video. Written by twitter, texting or email. One-on-one in private or from one-to-many in a group. Synchronous (an open, sharing conversation) or asynchronous (a memo to all, an announcement). Permanent (remember everything written is preserved by someone, somewhere in this brave new world) or ephemeral (subject to our malleable, less than precise memories which is often a good thing). Each is suitable and appropriate for a certain circumstance; clearly consider which is right for your circumstance.

Communication is craft and art that is honed through observation, education, experimentation and experience. Communicating is the last mile. It is not the message sent but the message received. Be a great communicator.

Believing is not an Option

In 1970, the ill-fated American Apollo 13 lunar landing mission suffered an oxygen tank explosion that crippled the critical service module and stranded the crew in orbit around the moon with no way home back to Earth. Through the ingenuity and determination of the astronauts and Mission Control back on the ground in Houston and with only the material, tools and skills available on their the severely damaged Apollo 13 space craft, repairs were successfully  made. A creative, alternative approach back to earth was plotted and the crew were returned with out further incident.

The Apollo 13 incident, with it’s life and death consequences, is an extreme outlier but starkly illustrates the ideal that “failure is not an option”. While those words were a Hollywood creation and were never actually uttered, Flight Dynamics Officer Jerry Bostick responded when asked in an interview by the script writers, Al Reinart and Bill Broyles, “Weren’t there times when everybody, or at least a few people, just panicked?” :

  “No, when bad things happened, we just calmly laid out all the options, and failure was not one of them. We never panicked, and we never gave up on finding a solution”.

They believed that the goal of returning the crew safely was possible despite extremely limited resources and options. What would have the outcome been had they felt that the goal was impossible because of those staggering odds against their success? When you are the leader and bad things happen, all eyes are on you. How will you react? If you believe the goal is impossible, then you will absolutely fail. If you believe that the goal is possible, then you have a chance of success. Both sides of the same coin are infectious; optimism on one side and pessimism one the other. Pessimism is self-fulfilling. Optimism opens the door to possible success.

132. What We Teach

“When we teach a child to make good decisions, we benefit from a lifetime of good decisions.

When we teach a child to love to learn, the amount of learning will become limitless.

When we teach a child to deal with a changing world, she will never become obsolete.

When we are brave enough to teach a child to question authority, even ours, we insulate ourselves from those who would use their authority to work against each of us.

And when we give students the desire to make things, even choices, we create a world filled with makers.”

Seth Godin, “Stop Stealing Dreams

Ninety-eight thought-provoking, insightful pages. Go … download, read, discuss, act.

Flourishing

Seth Godin wrote in his book Linchpin about a village in China named Dafen. Apparently a third, maybe more, of all the oil paintings produced in the world are painted in this village. They follow step-by-step procedures; pushing out massive quantities of reproductions and derivatives of original art. They are most certainly skilled, proficient painters. But no one would claim that they are artists. In the words of Seth, they follow a map.

People who follow maps are going to get paid less and less and work harder and harder, because the world is full people who can follow a map. And as our increasing globalized world gets smaller and smaller, access by employers and customers to people who can follow a maps get easier and easier, cheaper and cheaper.

At the same time we are at beginning of the next great revolution driven by digital technology effecting massive change every area of human endevour. The manner and ease of how people conduct their daily affairs locally, regionally and globally is changing rapidly and permanently. This recession aside, the world has reached a level and distribution of wealth never seen before. It is those that can navigate the world without a map, those that are creative, innovative, and entrepreneurial, that will flourish in the decades to come.